AGNS is a collection of words and drawings, a few of my favourites from the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. I spent a year living in Halifax and visiting the gallery to draw and think and learn to see the east coast like a local. This 17-page zine includes Emily Carr, Erica Rutherford, Frances Jones, Maud Lewis, Pablo Picasso, and the best marble boar you’ll ever meet. It’s about art, and making art, and making artists, and why the people out there love lobster. 
Before you head over to buy, here’s an excerpt:

People draw great works of art for all kinds of reasons. The best way to get good is to copy good things. The best place to find good things is your local art gallery. In Halifax, the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia was down the street from my apartment and, one day a week, admission was free after 6pm. A few weeks of regular visits after work, I thought I had seen everything. I started to draw everything. I stopped and sat and picked a piece off the wall. It was an excuse to slow down. It was another way to see this city I was only getting to know, but to which I had already committed a year.
Halifax was new and old and unfamiliar, but there were Emily Carr’s trees, standing tall above me. A piece of home from faraway.
I drew her wild swathes of green, brown, and blue in black pen on white. I drew Picasso, with not nearly the confidence he had in his line. I drew sculptures, though I could never get the curves like I saw them in my head. I drew what caught my eye, for practice and for keeps. When I went home—when I knew then that I would—I wanted to take a piece of the city with me.

AGNS: a sketchbook is $4, available for immediate download at Gumroad.

AGNS is a collection of words and drawings, a few of my favourites from the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. I spent a year living in Halifax and visiting the gallery to draw and think and learn to see the east coast like a local. This 17-page zine includes Emily Carr, Erica Rutherford, Frances Jones, Maud Lewis, Pablo Picasso, and the best marble boar you’ll ever meet. It’s about art, and making art, and making artists, and why the people out there love lobster. 

Before you head over to buy, here’s an excerpt:

People draw great works of art for all kinds of reasons. The best way to get good is to copy good things. The best place to find good things is your local art gallery. In Halifax, the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia was down the street from my apartment and, one day a week, admission was free after 6pm. A few weeks of regular visits after work, I thought I had seen everything. I started to draw everything. I stopped and sat and picked a piece off the wall. It was an excuse to slow down. It was another way to see this city I was only getting to know, but to which I had already committed a year.

Halifax was new and old and unfamiliar, but there were Emily Carr’s trees, standing tall above me. A piece of home from faraway.

I drew her wild swathes of green, brown, and blue in black pen on white. I drew Picasso, with not nearly the confidence he had in his line. I drew sculptures, though I could never get the curves like I saw them in my head. I drew what caught my eye, for practice and for keeps. When I went home—when I knew then that I would—I wanted to take a piece of the city with me.

AGNS: a sketchbook is $4, available for immediate download at Gumroad.

A new 24-page digital edition of The Cup is now available at Gumroad. You know I love paper, and I’ll continue to make paper books in the future of Cameron House Press, but this is a nice permanent place where they can all live and take care of themselves. The buying process is pain-free, and your download arrives immediately.
As I work on building up the catalogue and dream up new ideas, check out The Cup and the first collected volume of The General Review. Your support allows me to continue writing and making, and I thank you for that.
On to the next step.

A new 24-page digital edition of The Cup is now available at Gumroad. You know I love paper, and I’ll continue to make paper books in the future of Cameron House Press, but this is a nice permanent place where they can all live and take care of themselves. The buying process is pain-free, and your download arrives immediately.

As I work on building up the catalogue and dream up new ideas, check out The Cup and the first collected volume of The General Review. Your support allows me to continue writing and making, and I thank you for that.

On to the next step.

New books and new photos up at the shop!

I’m doing a zine-a-week, but I cheated a little bit today. Need to clear out the inventory, so, instead of something brand new, I’ve posted the last copies of an old travelogue that I think I’ll turn into a new series: poems about cities. As well, I’ve finally put up the second Cameron House Single. This one’s about Shakespeare.

Next week, something new new, I promise. But for now, new photos, a new banner, and a new project: a zine-a-week!

New books and new photos up at the shop!

I’m doing a zine-a-week, but I cheated a little bit today. Need to clear out the inventory, so, instead of something brand new, I’ve posted the last copies of an old travelogue that I think I’ll turn into a new series: poems about cities. As well, I’ve finally put up the second Cameron House Single. This one’s about Shakespeare.

Next week, something new new, I promise. But for now, new photos, a new banner, and a new project: a zine-a-week!

The Single is our house zine. Sometimes an essay isn’t long enough to warrant a whole book. Sometimes, eight pages is all you need. The Cameron House Single is a single essay on a single topic printed on a single piece of paper.

It’s fitting that the first Single should be about music. Issue 1 was written after Björk won the Polar Music Prize. I loved Björk when I was in high school; I think a lot of girls who came of age in the ’90s did. While I don’t follow her music as closely as I once did, I still think she’s amazing. She made her own way, and even if I didn’t love her music, I would love that.

The Single is our house zine. Sometimes an essay isn’t long enough to warrant a whole book. Sometimes, eight pages is all you need. The Cameron House Single is a single essay on a single topic printed on a single piece of paper.

It’s fitting that the first Single should be about music. Issue 1 was written after Björk won the Polar Music Prize. I loved Björk when I was in high school; I think a lot of girls who came of age in the ’90s did. While I don’t follow her music as closely as I once did, I still think she’s amazing. She made her own way, and even if I didn’t love her music, I would love that.